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《呼啸山庄》节选中英文对照

作者:stephen    文章来源:本站原创    点击数:    更新时间:2007-3-27 【我来说两句

《呼啸山庄》节选中英文对照

To obviate the danger of this threat being fulfilled, Mr Linton commissioned me to take the boy home early, on Catherine's pony; and, said he: `As we shall now have no influence over his destiny, good or bad, you must say nothing of where he is gone, to my daughter: she cannot associate with him hereafter, and it is better for her to remain in ignorance of his proximity; lest she should be restless, and anxious to visit the Heights. Merely tell her his father sent for him suddenly, and he has been obliged to leave us.'

Linton was very reluctant to be roused from his bed at five o'clock, and astonished to be informed that he must prepare for further travelling; but I softened off the matter by stating that he was going to spend some time with his father, Mr Heathcliff, who wished to see him so much, he did not like to defer the pleasure till he should recover from his late journey.

`My father!' he cried, in strange perplexity. `Mamma never told me I had a father. Where does he live? I'd rather stay with uncle.'

`He lives a little distance from the Grange,' I replied; `just beyond those hills: not so far, but you may walk over here when you get hearty. And you should be glad to go home, and to see him. You must try to love him, as you did your mother, and then he will love you.'

`But why have I not heard of him before?' asked Linton. `Why didn't mamma and he live together, as other people do?'

`He had business to keep him in the north,' I answered, `and your mother's health required her to reside in the south.'

`And why didn't mamma speak to me about him?' persevered the child. `She often talked of uncle, and I learnt to love him long ago. How am I to love papa? I don't know him.'

`Oh, all children love their parents,' I said. `Your mother, perhaps, thought you would want to be with him if she mentioned him often to you. Let us make haste. An early ride on such a beautiful morning is much preferable to an hour's more sleep.

`Is she to go with us,' he demanded: `the little girl I saw yesterday?' replied I.

`Is uncle?' he continued.

`No, I shall be your companion there,' I said.

Linton sank back on his pillow and fell into a brown study.

`I won't go without uncle,' he cried at length: `I can't tell where you mean to take me.'

I attempted to persuade him of the naughtiness of showing reluctance to meet his father; still he obstinately resisted any progress towards dressing, and I had to call for my master's assistance in coaxing him out of bed. The poor thing was finally got off, with several delusive assurances that his absence should be short; that Mr Edgar and Cathy would visit him, and other promises, equally ill-founded, which I invented and reiterated at intervals throughout the way. The pure heather-scented air, and the bright sunshine, and the gentle canter of Minny, relieved his despondency after a while. He began to put questions concerning his new home, and its inhabitants, with greater interest and liveliness.

`Is Wuthering Heights as pleasant a place as Thrushcross Grange?' he inquired, turning to take a last glance into the valley, whence a light mist mounted and formed a fleecy cloud on the skirts of the blue.

`It is not so buried in trees,' I replied, `and it is not quite so large, but you can see the country beautifully all round; and the air is healthier for you--fresher and dryer. You will, perhaps, think the building old and dark at first; though it is a respectable house: the next best in the neighbourhood. And you will have such nice rambles on the moors. Hareton Earnshaw--that is Miss Cathy's other cousin, and so yours in a manner--will show you all the sweetest spots; and you can bring a book in fine weather, and make a green hollow your study; and, now and then, your uncle may join you in a walk: he does, frequently, walk out on the hills.'

`And what is my father like?' he asked. `Is he as young and handsome as uncle?'

`He's as young,' said I; `but he has black hair and eyes, and looks sterner; and he is taller and bigger altogether. He'll not seem to you so gentle and kind at first, perhaps, because it is not his way: still, mind you, be frank and cordial with him; and naturally he'll be fonder of you than any uncle, for you are his own.'

`Black hair and eyes!' mused Linton. `I can't fancy him. Then I am not like him, am I?'

`Not much,' I answered: not a morsel, I thought, surveying with regret the white complexion and slim frame of my companion, and his large languid eyes--his mother's eyes, save that, unless a morbid touchiness kindled them a moment, they had not a vestige of her sparkling spirit.

`How strange that he should never come to see mamma and me!' he murmured. `Has he ever seen me? If he have, I must have been a baby. I remember not a single thing about him!'

`Why, Master Linton,' said I, `three hundred miles is a great distance; and ten years seem very different in length to a grown-up person compared with what they do to you. It is probable Mr Heathcliff proposed going from summer to summer, but never found a convenient opportunity; and now it is too late. Don't trouble him with questions on the subject: it will disturb him, for no good.'

The boy was fully occupied with his own cogitations for the remainder of the ride, till we halted before the farmhouse garden gate. I watched to catch his impressions in his countenance. He surveyed the carved front and low-browed lattices, the straggling gooseberry bushes and crooked firs, with solemn intentness, and then shook his head: his private feelings entirely disapproved of the exterior of his new abode. But he had sense to postpone complaining: there might be compensation within. Before he dismounted, I went and opened the door. It was half past six; the family had just finished breakfast; the servant was clearing and wiping down the table. Joseph stood by his master's chair telling some tale concerning a lame horse; and Hareton was preparing for the hay field.

`Hallo, Nelly!' cried Mr Heathcliff, when he saw me. `I feared I should have to come down and fetch my property myself. You've brought it, have you? Let us see what we can make of it.'

He got up and strode to the door. Hareton and Joseph followed in gaping curiosity. Poor Linton ran a frightened eye over the faces of the three.

`Sure-ly,' said Joseph, after a grave inspection, `he's swopped wi' ye, maister, an' yon's his lass!'

Heathcliff, having stared his son into an ague of confusion, uttered a scornful laugh.

`God! what a beauty! what a lovely, charming thing!' he exclaimed. `Haven't they reared it on snails and sour milk, Nelly? Oh, damn my soul! but that's worse than I expected--and the devil knows I was not sanguine!'

I bid the trembling and bewildered child get down, and enter. He did not thoroughly comprehend the meaning of his father's speech, or whether it were intended for him: indeed, he was not yet certain that the grim, sneering stranger was his father. But he clung to me with growing trepidation; and on Mr Heathcliff's taking a seat and bidding him `come hither', he hid his face on my shoulder and wept.

`Tut, tut!' said Heathcliff, stretching out a hand and dragging him roughly between his knees, and then holding up his head by the chin. `None of that nonsense! We're not going to hurt thee, Linton--isn't that thy name? Thou art thy mother's child, entirely! Where is my share in thee, puling chicken?'

He took off the boy's cap and pushed back his thick flaxen curls, felt his slender arms and his small fingers; during which examination, Linton ceased crying, and lifted his great blue eyes to inspect the inspector.

`Do you know me?' asked Heathcliff, having satisfied himself that the limbs were all equally frail and feeble.

`No,' said Linton, with a gaze of vacant fear.

`You've heard of me, I dare say?'

`No,' he replied again.

`No? What a shame of your mother, never to waken your filial regard for me! You are my son, then, I'll tell you; and your mother was a wicked slut to leave you in ignorance of the sort of father you possessed. Now, don't wince, and colour up! Though it is something to see you have not white blood. Be a good lad; and I'll do for you. Nelly, if you be tired you may sit down; if not, get home again. I guess you'll report what you hear and see to the cipher at the Grange; and this thing won't be settled while you linger about it.'

`Well,' replied I, `I hope you'll be kind to the boy, Mr Heathcliff, or you'll not keep him long; and he's all you have akin in the wide world, that you will ever know--remember.'

`I'll be very kind to him, you needn't fear,' he said, laughing. `Only nobody else must be kind to him: I'm jealous of monopolizing his affection. And, to begin my kindness, Joseph, bring the lad some breakfast. Hareton, you infernal calf, begone to your work. Yes, Nell,' he added, when they had departed, `my son is prospective owner of your place, and I should not wish him to die till I was certain of being his successor. Besides, he's mine, and I want the triumph of seeing my descendant fairly lord of their estates: my child hiring their children to till their father's lands for wages. That is the sole consideration which can make me endure the whelp: I despise him for himself, and hate him for the memories he revives! But that consideration is sufficient: he's as safe with me, and shall be tended as carefully as your master tends his own. I have a room upstairs, furnished for him in handsome style: I've engaged a tutor, also, to come three times a week, from twenty miles distance, to teach him what he pleases to learn. I've ordered Hareton to obey him; and in fact I've arranged everything with a view to preserve the superior and the gentleman in him, above his associates. I do regret, however, that he so little deserves the trouble; if I wished any blessing in the world, it was to find him a worthy object of pride; and I'm bitterly disappointed with the whey-faced whining wretch!'

While he was speaking, Joseph returned bearing a basin of milk porridge, and placed it before Linton. He stirred round the homely mess with a look of aversion, and affirmed he could not eat it. I saw the old manservant shared largely in his master's scorn of the child; though he was compelled to retain the sentiment in his heart, because Heathcliff plainly meant his underlings to hold him in honour.

`Cannot ate it?' repeated he, peering in Linton's face, and subduing his voice to a whisper, for fear of being overheard. `But Maister Hareton nivir ate naught else, when he wer a little un; and what were gooid eneugh for him's gooid eneugh for ye, Aw's rayther think!'

`I shan't eat it!' answered Linton snappishly. `Take it away.' Joseph snatched up the food indignantly, and brought it to us. `Is there aught ails th' victuals?' he asked thrusting the tray under Heathcliff's nose.

`What should ail them?' he said.

`Wah!' answered Joseph, `yon dainty chap says he cannut ate em. But Aw guess it's raight! His mother wer just soa--we wer a'most too mucky to sow t' corn for makking her breead.'

`Don't mention his mother to me,' said the master angrily. `Get him something that he can eat, that's all. What is his usual food, Nelly?'

I suggested boiled milk or tea; and the housekeeper received instructions to prepare some. Come, I reflected, his father's selfishness may contribute to his comfort. He perceives his delicate constitution, and the necessity of treating him tolerably. I'll console Mr Edgar by acquainting him with the turn Heathcliff's humour has taken. Having no excuse for lingering longer I slipped out, while Linton was engaged in timidly rebuilding the advances of a friendly sheepdog. But he was too much on the alert to be cheated: as I closed the door, I heard a cry, and a frantic repetition of the words:

`Don't leave me! I'll not stay here! I'll not stay here!'

Then the latch was raised and fell: they did not suffer him to come forth. I mounted Minny, and urged her to a trot; and so my brief guardianship ended.

为了避免这威吓实现的危险,林惇先生派我早早地送这孩子回家,让他骑着凯瑟琳的小马去。他说,——“既然我们现在不能对于他的命运有所影响,无论是好或坏,你就千万别对我女儿说他去哪里了,今后她不能同他有什么联系,最好别让她知道他就在邻近;不然她就安不下心来,急着去呼啸山庄。你就告诉她说他的父亲忽然差人来接他,他就只好离开我们走了。”

五点钟时,好容易才把林惇从床上唤起来,一听说他还得准备再上路,大吃一惊;但是我告诉他得跟他的父亲希刺克厉夫先生住些时候,并说他父亲多么想看他,不愿再延迟这种见面的快乐,都等不及他恢复旅途的疲劳,这样才把事情缓和下来。

“我的父奈”他叫起来,莫名其妙地纳闷着。“妈妈从来没有告诉过我说我有一个父亲。他住在哪儿?我情愿跟舅舅住在一起。”

“他住在离山庄不远的地方,”我回答,“就在那些小山那边,不算怎么远,等你身体好些,你可以散步到这儿来。你应该欢欢喜喜地回家去见他。你一定得试着爱他,像对母亲一样,那么他也就会爱你了。”

“可是为什么我以前没听说过他呢?”林惇问道。“为什么妈妈不跟他住在一起,像别人家一样?”

“他有事情得留在北方。”我回答,“而你母亲的健康情况需要她住在南方。”

“可为什么妈妈没跟我说起他来呢?”这孩子固执地问下去。“她常常谈起舅舅,我老早就知道爱他了。我怎么去爱爸爸呢?我不认识他。”

“啊,所有的孩子们都爱他们的父母。”我说,“也许你母亲以为她要是常跟你提起他,你或者会想跟他住在一起哩。我们赶快去吧。在这样美丽的早晨,早早骑马出去比多睡一个钟头可好多了。”

“昨天我看见的那个小姑娘是不是跟我们一同去?”他问。

“现在不去。”我回答。

“舅舅呢?”他又问。

“不去,我要陪你去那儿的。”我说。

林惇又倒在他的枕头上,沉思起来。

“没有舅舅我就不去。”他终于叫喊起来了,“我闹不清你到底打算把我带到哪儿去。”

我企图说服他,说他如果表现出不愿意见他父亲,那是没规矩的行为;他仍然执拗地反抗我,不许我给他穿衣服,我只好叫主人来帮忙哄他起床。我许下了好多渺茫的保证,说他去不多久一定能回来的,说埃德加先生和凯蒂会去看他的,还有其他的诺言,毫无根据,都是我一时瞎编出来的,而且一路上我还时不时地重复着这些诺言。终于,这可怜的小东西出发了。过了一会,那纯洁的、带着青草香味的空气,那灿烂的阳光,以及敏妮的轻轻的缓步使他的沮丧神气缓和下来了。他开始带着较大的兴趣盘问他的新家的情形,家里住些什么人。

“呼啸山庄是不是一个跟画眉田庄一样好玩的地方?”他问,同时转过头向山谷中望了最后一眼,从那里有一片轻雾升起,在蓝色天空的边缘上形成了一朵白云。

“它不是像这样隐在树荫里。”我回答,“而且也没这么大,但是你四面可以看得到美丽的乡村景色;那空气对你的健康也比较适宜——比较新鲜干燥。也许你起初会觉得那所房子又旧又黑;虽然那是一所很漂亮的房子,在这附近是数一数二的了。而且你还可以在旷野里好好地溜达溜达。哈里顿·恩萧——就是,凯蒂小姐另一个表哥,也就是你的表哥,——他会带你到一切最可爱的地点看看;好天气时,你还可以带本书,把绿色的山谷当作你的书房,而且,有时候,你舅舅还可以和你一块散步,他是常常出来在山中散步的。”

“我父亲什么样?”他问。“他是不是跟舅舅一样的年轻漂亮?”

“他也是那么年轻,”我说,“可是他有黑头发和黑眼睛,而且看上去比较严厉些,也高大一些。也许一开始你觉得他不怎么和气仁慈,因为这不是他的作风;可是,你得记住,还是要跟他坦白和亲切;他就会很自然地比任何舅舅还要更喜欢你,因为你是他自己的孩子啊。”

“黑头发,黑眼睛”林惇沉思着。“我想象不出来。那么我长得不像他啦,是吗?”

“不太像,”我回答,同时心里想着:一点也不像,抱憾地望望我的同伴的白皙的容貌和纤瘦的骨骼,还有他那大而无神的眼睛——他母亲的眼睛,只是,有一种病态的焦躁会偶然地点亮这对眼睛,它们一点也没有她那种闪烁神采的痕迹。

“他从来没有去看过妈妈和我,这多奇怪!”他咕噜着。

“他看见过我没有?要是他看见过,那一定还在我是婴孩的时候。关于他,我一件事也记不得了!”

“啊,林惇少爷。”我说,“三百英里是很长的距离;而十年对于一个成年人和对于你却是不一样长短的。没准希刺克厉夫年年夏天打算去,可是从来没有找到适当的机会;现在又太晚了。关于这件事不要老问他使他心烦吧:那会使他不安的,没有一点好处。”

这孩子后来一路上就只顾想他自己的心思,直到我停在住宅花园的大门前。我细看他脸上现出什么印象。他一本正经地仔细观看着那刻花的正面房屋与矮檐的格子窗,那蔓生的醋栗丛和弯曲的枞树,然后摇摇头;他自己完全不喜欢他这新居的外表。但是他还懂得先不忙抱怨:也许里面好些,还可以弥补一下。在他下马之前,我走去开门。那时正是六点半;全家刚用过早餐;仆人正在收拾和擦桌子。约瑟夫站在他主人的椅子旁边,正在讲着关于一匹跛马的事;哈里顿正预备到干草地里去。

“好啊,耐莉!”希刺克厉夫看到我时便说,“我还恐怕自己得下山取那属于我的东西呢。你把他带来啦,是吧?让我们看看我们能把他造就成什么样的人才。”

他站起来,大步走到门口,哈里顿和约瑟夫跟着,好奇地张大着嘴。可怜的林惇害怕地对这三个人的脸溜了一眼。

“一定的,”约瑟夫严肃地细看一番,说,“他跟你掉换啦,主人,这是他的女娃!”

希刺克厉夫盯着他的儿子,盯得他儿子慌张打颤,他发出一声嘲弄的笑声。

“上帝,一个多么漂亮的人儿!一个多么可爱的、娇媚的东西!”他叫着。“他们不是用蜗牛和酸牛奶养活他的吧,耐莉?该死!可那是比我所期望的还要糟——鬼才晓得我自己过去有没有血色呢!”

我叫那颤抖着的、迷惑的孩子下马进来。他还不能完全理解他父亲的话里的意思,或者以为不是指他说的:实在,他还不大相信这个令人生畏的、讥笑着的陌生人就是他的父亲。但是他越来越哆嗦着紧贴着我;而在希刺克厉夫坐下来,叫他“过来”时,他把脸伏在我的肩膀上哭起来。

“得!”希刺克厉夫说,伸出一只手来,粗野地把他拉到他两膝中间,然后扳起他的下巴使他的头抬起来。“别胡闹!我们并不要伤害您,林惇,这是不是您的名字?您可真是您母亲的孩子,完全是!在您身体里我的成分可在哪儿啦,吱吱叫的小鸡?”

他把那孩子的小帽摘下来,把他的厚厚的淡黄的卷发向后推推,摸摸他的瘦胳臂和他的小手指头;在他这样检查的时候,林惇停止了哭泣,抬起他的蓝色的大眼睛也审视着这位检查者。

“你认识我吗?”希刺克厉夫问道,他已经检查过这孩子的四肢全是一样的脆弱。

“不!”林惇说,带着一种茫然的恐惧注视着他。

“我敢说你总听说过我吧?”

“没有。”他又回答。

“没有!这是你母亲的耻辱,从来不引起你对我的孝心!那么,我告诉你吧,你是我的儿子;你母亲是一个极坏的贱人,竟让你不知道你有个什么样的父亲。现在,不要畏缩,不要脸红!不过倒也可以看出你的血总算不是白色的。作个好孩子,我也要为你尽力。耐莉,如果你累了,你可以坐下来;如果不的话,就回家去。我猜你会把你听见的、看见的全报告给田庄那个废物;而这个东西在你还留连不去时是不会安定下来的。”

“好吧,”我回答,“我希望你会对这孩子慈爱,希刺克厉夫先生,不然你就留不住他,而他是你在这个广阔的世界里所知道的唯一的亲人了——记住吧。”

“我会对他非常慈爱的,你用不着害怕,”他说,大笑着。

“可就是用不着别人对他慈爱;我一心要独占他的感情。而且,现在就开始我的慈爱,约瑟夫,给这孩子拿点早餐来。哈里顿,你这地狱里的呆子,干你的活去。是的,耐儿,”他等他们都走了又说,“我的儿子是你们这里未来的主人,而且在我能确定他可以作继承人之前,我不应该愿意他死掉。此外,他是我的,我愿意胜利地看见我的后代很堂皇地作他们的产业的主人,我的孩子用工钱雇他们的孩子种他们父亲的土地。就是这唯一的动机才使我能容忍这个小狗仔:对他本身,我可瞧不起他,而且为了他所引起的回忆而憎恨他!但是有那个动机就足够了;他跟我在一起是同样的安全,而且也会招呼得和你的主人招呼他自己的孩子一样的仔细。我在楼上有间屋子,已经为他收拾得很漂亮;我还从二十英里路外,请了一位教师,一星期来三次,他想学什么就教他什么。我还命令哈里顿要服从他,事实上我安排了一切,想在他心上培养优越感与绅士气质,要他在那些和他在一起的人们之上。但我很遗憾:他不配人家这样操心,如果我还希望在这世界上有什么幸福的话,那就是发现他是一个值得我骄傲的东西,但这白脸、呜呜哭着的东西却使我十分失望!”

他说话的时候约瑟夫端着一盆牛奶粥回来了,并且把它放在林惇面前:林惇带着厌恶的神色搅着这盆不可口的粥,肯定说他吃不下去。我看见那个老仆人跟他主人一样,也轻视这孩子;虽然他被迫把这种情绪留在心里,因为希刺克厉夫很明显地要他的下人们尊敬他。

“吃不下去?”他重复着说,瞅着林惇的脸,又压低了声音咕噜着,怕人家听见。“可是哈里顿少爷在小时候从来不吃别的东西,我想他能吃的东西你也能吃吧!”

“我不吃!”林惇执拗地回答着,“把它拿走。”

约瑟夫愤怒地把食物急急抢去,把它送到我们跟前。

“这吃的有什么不好?”他问,把盘子向希刺克厉夫鼻子底下一推。

“有什么不好?”他说。

“对啊!”约瑟夫回答,“你这讲究的孩子说他吃不下去。可我看挺好,他母亲就这样——我们种粮食,给她作面包,她倒嫌我们脏哩。”

“不要对我提起他母亲,”主人生气地说,“就给他拿点他能吃的东西算了。耐莉,他平常吃什么?”

我建议煮牛奶或茶,管家奉命去准备了。嗯,我想他父亲的自私倒使他日子还好过些呢。他看到林惇娇弱的体质,有必要对他宽厚些。我要报告埃德加先生,说希刺克厉夫的脾气有什么样的转变,借以安慰他。我已经没有理由再留下来,就溜出去了,这时候林惇正在怯懦地抗拒着一条看羊狗的友好表示。但是他十分警觉,骗不了他:我一关上门,就听见一声叫喊,和一连串反复的狂喊:“别离开我,我不要在这儿!

我不要在这儿!”

跟着,门闩抬起来又落下了:他们不许他出来。我骑上敏妮,叫它快跑;于是我这短促的保护责任就此告终。

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